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there browning of the electorate that that fear and anxiety is legitimate and we all need to leave cognizant and listen to the side to find the common ground to where we can feel good to what is possible. especially collectivity. >> host: what you teach? >> guest: i am a filmmaker so right now we focus on graduate courses that films can be a medium for scholarship. for those that write these books but if you make a film then everybody would see the project. that is the incentives but it might allow you if you use film to tell a story it might allow you to say different things about the world. but a visual dissertation to think about producing knowledge these images and sound account as scholarship the way a journal article would count not just the public scholarship. we do that across the graduate curriculum. and finishing a syllabus now how to do anthropological research. so how do we recalibrate for these interesting concept? >> host: who is anthro man? >> guest: a super hero alter ego. news speak to fox and talk to them one of my problems as a fledgling anthropologist was i was incredibly
at the center of this story in some respects because it's thanks to bp and john brown, the longtime sew -- ceo of bp, that i actually got into this business. and so at the beginning of the 1990s i was with john brown flying into russia as he sent the first teams of bp people to look over various possibilities. and we went to places like west siberia where a new democratic government had taken over in the wake of a coup or near coup. of course, we remember the late period of bp and of john brown which was less happy, but in those days he was really the embodiment of the entrepreneur and true. and his vision was that russia was the place to be, but it happened in a way that he never imagined. it happened because through a combination of flukes and circumstances he was able to gain for bp access to one of the prime developed areas, one of what they call in the oil business brown field areas of russia. and in particular the one field that had been the prime field in soviet days called -- [speaking in native tongue] he was able to get an opportunity to gain control of that field in that area and th
: at the end of 1988. c-span: was the per code that you discussed? >> guest: 54 to 63. the year the brown decision, the year the supreme court unanimously said in effect their racial segregation and subornation is in conflict with the american constitution, kind of reading the challenge of the civil war period about slavery being in conflict with promise of equal citizenship. though that's 54, i'm going to 68 when that movement, built on that premise, largely dissolved. and it's the same year dr. king was killed. c-span: i have a better copy of "parting the waters." this is a paperback version. you won a pulitzer prize for this. how many hardback copies did you sell and how many of these paperbacks up to today? >> guest: i would have to talk to my publisher. only be a rough estimate of 100,000 heart attacks and 200 or maybe 300,000 paperbacks which it is peanuts for stephen king for a big six history book based on a subject that might make some people uncomfortable, but other people for me at least it's a great leveling transformation to hear. there's a lot of black heroes and white heroe
with that. and because of that, i was able to do that, our secretary of commerce, ron brown, asked me if i would chair at the 50th anniversary of the united nations the africa lunch which the u.s. was doing at that time. which i did. he said if you can do that, then you can take care of anything else, bill. so, i mean, there have been a lot of people. you mentioned secretaries of treasuries here in the united states, certainly the various heads of the fed and central bankers i think worldwide. i think one of the things that we need to see more of getting to the point that i know you wanted me to talk about is we need the leadership. and we haven't seen the tough leadership in europe that we need to see to get out of crises. we were very lucky in the case of the latin american debt crisis that we had paul volcker at the fed, and we had jacques dela rosier at the international monetary fund. and, you know, because the world -- people forget now, it was so long ago, in the early '80s it was about to go under. in fact, they compared it to moving deck chairs on the titanic. and that worked out.
to do that our secretary of commerce ron brown asked me if i would cheer at the 50th anniversary in admissions the africa lunch that the us was getting at that time, which it did because he said look, if you can do that, then you can take everything else. so i mean, that lot of people. you mentioned secretaries of treasury here in the united states. certainly the very sense of the fed and central bankers i think worldwide. i think one of the things we need to see more of getting to the point that a now he wanted me to talk about was unique leadership. and we haven't seen the tough leadership in europe that we need to see to get out of crisis. we were very lucky in the case of the latin american debt crisis, that we had paul volcker at the fed and web -- two of the most outstanding people, public sector people i've ever known. the world people forget now, it's a long ago, the early '80s was about to go under. in fact, they compared it to moving deck chairs on the titanic. that worked out. i think nick brady with his breed plan felt we had really real leadership, and i think that's
out. seeing the unimaginable lovell of destruction, it looked like a jerry brown climber fell. like a monster came out of the ocean and smashed the city. it was flat. a complete dead zone. many people died and many people survived this is not in the book but i was in the back of a pickup trucks may be four days after the earthquake. and was sitting there tidying what i sought and even typed jerry brock camera film some guys came around and rescinding next to what used to be a hospital. they came through and said are you american? they said is the hospital open? literally. [laughter] but clearly not operating. they said they came from kansas city and they had raised money and brought pharmaceuticals and bandages and medical supplies they drove out there because they heard it is in dire straits and wanted to help it if i had seen any ngos to give the medicine to. i said no. then they walked out into the rebel field. this was four days afterwards. it was interesting. people were overly focused on parts that were hit by the earthquake but overly concerned of port-au-prince but the major
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6